Wyoming Highway Patrol
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"80 means 80"
With over two weeks of the new 80 mile per hour speed limit on 488 miles of Wyoming interstate highways in the books, we are emphasizeing that 80 mph means 80 mph. Troopers across the state that work in these 80 mph zones are reporting that motorists are pushing their speeds past the posted limit and are increasing the risk of being stopped.  The safety and welfare of the motoring public is a priority to the Wyoming Highway Patrol and that the 80 mph speed limit will be strictly enforced.  Increasing your speed reduces the amount of time you have to react to avoid becoming involved in a crash or avoid a hazard on the road. The speed limit is set to keep motorists operating at a safe speed on the highways. When drivers go over that limit, they risk injuring themselves and others. Obey the limit and avoid becoming a statistic.
 

 


ROAD & TRAVEL INFORMATION

  • For Road & Travel Information call:

    IN-STATE:  511 OR  1-888-WYO-ROAD (996-7623)

    OUT OF STATE: 1-888- WYO-ROAD (996-7623) 

TO REPORT A DRUNK DRIVER OR AN EMERGENCY

  • To contact the Patrol in an emergency or to Report a Drunk Driver:

    IN STATE CALL: 1-800-442-9090

    OUT OF STATE  CALL: 1-307-777-4321  

VIN INSPECTION LEADS TO DRUNK DRIVING ARREST AT W H P HEADQUARTERS

VIN INSPECTION LEADS TO DRUNK DRIVING ARREST AT W H P HEADQUARTERS

Date: 07/17/2014 

Cheyenne - Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) inspections are conducted at the headquarters of the Wyoming Highway Patrol in Cheyenne on a daily basis. On Tuesday, July 15th, 58 year old Daniel K. Adamson of Wheatland, Wyoming traveled to Cheyenne for one such VIN inspection. Upon his arrival and request for an inspection at WHP headquarters, troopers smelled a strong odor of alcohol coming from Mr. Adamson. An impaired driving investigation began and Mr. Adamson was placed under arrest for driving while under the influence of alcohol.           The Wyoming Highway Patrol would like to remind...

MULTIAGENCY CHILD SAFETY EVENT HELD IN UINTA COUNTY

MULTIAGENCY CHILD SAFETY EVENT HELD IN UINTA COUNTY

Date: 07/15/2014 

     Uinta County was host to two safety events geared towards child passenger safety recently. One event was held in Evanston and one in Mountain View. Child passenger seat technicians were present to inspect child restraints and bicycle helmets including technicians from Safe Kids and the Wyoming Highway Patrol. Troopers from the Utah Highway Patrol also helped at the safety event in Evanston.      Sergeant Duane Ellis, Wyoming Highway Patrol safety education coordinator, participated in the Mountain View event on July 9th and reported that 29 child seats were checked finding 12 misuses of the...

TROOPERS COORDINATE WITH TRUCKING COMPANY IN THE RECOVERY OF A COMMERCIAL TRACTOR / TRAILER

TROOPERS COORDINATE WITH TRUCKING COMPANY IN THE RECOVERY OF A COMMERCIAL TRACTOR / TRAILER

Date: 07/10/2014 

On July 03rd, 2014 at approximately 2:39 pm, troopers were notified to be on the lookout (BOLO) for a 2009 Peterbuilt commercial tractor with trailer being driven by 38 year old Onelio Vega of Hesperia, California. It was reported to the Patrol that Mr. Vega was not authorized to be driving the truck and that Mr. Vega was possibly under the influence of an unknown substance.  The initial report started on the eastern edge of Wyoming at Pine Bluffs on Interstate 80 with the truck traveling westbound. Through cooperation with the trucking company's (Landforce Trucking) global positioning system on...

80 mph speed limit coming to more than half of Wyoming's interstate mileage

80 mph speed limit coming to more than half of Wyoming's interstate mileage

Date: 06/24/2014 

Motorists will soon be able to legally drive up to 80 mph on nearly 500 miles of rural  interstate highway in Wyoming, resulting from action taken by the state Legislature during its 2014 session. On July 1, WYDOT crews will begin the process of changing speed limit signs along three sections of Interstate 25, totaling 268 miles in length, as well as on three sections of I-80 (116 miles) and two sections of I-90 (104 miles). The agency hopes to complete sign changeover work by the beginning of the Fourth of July holiday weekend. Motorists should be aware that during the transition, the 75 mph speed...

TROOPER'S PATROL CAR STRUCK & TROOPER INJURED

TROOPER'S PATROL CAR STRUCK & TROOPER INJURED

Date: 04/30/2014 

Buffalo – A Wyoming Highway Patrol Trooper is recovering at home following a Wednesday morning incident in which his parked patrol car was struck by a vehicle on WYO 387 approximately 8 miles north of Midwest in southern Johnson County.  Trooper Richard Burridge who was seated in his patrol car, sustained minor injuries after his patrol car was hit from behind by a pickup while Troopers were investigating a previous crash scene and several slide offs in the area.  Trooper Burridge was transported by another Trooper to Johnson County Memorial Hospital in Buffalo where he has been treated and released...

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.

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