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TWO IN CUSTODY AFTER STOLEN VEHICLE PURSUIT NORTH OF CHEYENNE

TWO IN CUSTODY AFTER STOLEN VEHICLE PURSUIT NORTH OF CHEYENNE

Date: 09/27/2016 

Two Billings, Montana residents are in custody after leading a Wyoming State Trooper on an early morning chase northwest of Cheyenne on September 26th. Justin Fuller, 25 years old, and Taylor Graves, 18 years old, were both taken into custody after the vehicle chase and a brief foot pursuit ended in a pasture near Laramie County Road 216 and Wyoming State Highway 211 (Horse Creek Road).     At 00:55 a.m. on September 26th, WHP Troopers were dispatched to a Chevrolet Corvette driving erratic on Interstate 25 southbound. A WHP Trooper located the vehicle just north of Cheyenne on I-25. As the Trooper...

TROOPER IN STABLE CONDITION AFTER FATAL CRASH SOUTH OF SHERIDAN

TROOPER IN STABLE CONDITION AFTER FATAL CRASH SOUTH OF SHERIDAN

Date: 09/23/2016 

On September 22nd around 9:30 p.m., Wyoming Highway Patrol Troopers in the Sheridan area were responding to a report of a vehicle traveling the wrong direction in the eastbound lanes of Interstate 90. While responding to the call, a Wyoming Highway Patrol Trooper was struck head-on by a 2014 Chevrolet Cruze passenger car traveling the wrong direction.    The crash occurred at mile post 38 on I 90 in the eastbound lanes at 9:32 p.m. approximately 13 miles south of Sheridan.    The Trooper involved in the crash is currently in stable condition. The 23 year old male driver of the Chevy Cruze sustained...

PURSUIT ENDS AT WALCOTT JUNCTION

PURSUIT ENDS AT WALCOTT JUNCTION

Date: 08/18/2016 

A 23 year old resident of Nashville, Tennessee is in custody after eluding authorities in two states for approximately two and a half hours on August 17th.    Troy Douglas initially eluded law enforcement in Nebraska for approximately five miles on I-80 and US Highway 30 after a Nebraska State Trooper tried to stop Douglas for speeding in a 2013 Chrysler 300 passenger car. Once Douglas entered Wyoming on US 30 at Pine Bluffs, the Nebraska Trooper discontinued his pursuit and notified Wyoming law enforcement to be on the lookout for the vehicle.    WHP Troopers in Laramie County, the Pine Bluffs...

ONE OF WHP'S FOUR LEGGED FINEST RETIRES

ONE OF WHP'S FOUR LEGGED FINEST RETIRES

Date: 08/15/2016 

Wyoming Highway Patrol K-9 Kato is officially retired today after seven years of service to Wyoming.    K-9 Kato was originally assigned to Trooper Jason Green in 2009. After Trooper Green promoted to lieutenant in 2011, Kato was reassigned to Trooper Brandon Deckert in Pinedale until Kato's retirement.   Kato has made significant contributions to public safety over his career. Kato was deployed 321 times resulting in the seizure of 277 pounds of marijuana, 5.4 pounds of methamphetamine, $182,273 dollars of US currency directly related to drug trafficking, approximately 1 pound of prescription...

WHP CAPTAIN TO RETIRE

WHP CAPTAIN TO RETIRE

Date: 08/10/2016 

Captain Troy McLees will retire from the Wyoming Highway Patrol effective August 12th, 2016 after 25 years of service to Wyoming.    Captain McLees began his career with the WHP on August 12th, 1991 as a Patrolman in Pine Bluffs and Cheyenne. After serving in this role until January of 2001, McLees promoted to sergeant in the Safety and Training division of Patrol where he ran the safety education program. In May of 2006, McLees promoted again to lieutenant in Safety and Training where he oversaw intra-agency training, WHP recruit hiring, the WHP recruit academy and the safety education program....

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.
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