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COLONEL HALLER PROMOTES TWO NEW LIEUTENANTS

COLONEL HALLER PROMOTES TWO NEW LIEUTENANTS

Date: 02/21/2017 

Wyoming Highway Patrol Colonel Kebin Haller appointed two new division lieutenants today (Feb. 13th) to fill two vacancies in the first line supervisor ranks of the Patrol. The lieutenants took part in an extensive promotional process to achieve their new rank.    Trooper Andrew Frye has been promoted to become the supervising lieutenant of Division "F" in Wheatland. Division "F" is responsible for Patrol duties in Goshen and Platte Counties. Lt. Frye has been with the Patrol since December of 2011 patrolling primarily in Sweetwater County. Lt. Frye will be replacing Captain Steve Sanders who promoted...

WHP IMPLEMENTS "SLICK TOP" PATROL CARS TO INCREASE HIGHWAY SAFETY

WHP IMPLEMENTS "SLICK TOP" PATROL CARS TO INCREASE HIGHWAY SAFETY

Date: 02/21/2017 

The Wyoming Highway Patrol has implemented a new pilot program utilizing "slick top" patrol cars in hopes of increasing highway safety across Wyoming. The five new vehicles will be patrolling Wyoming with one of the cars headed to each of the five WHP districts across the state.       WHP Colonel Kebin Haller commented on the program and said "I am excited to see the results of this initiative. Slick top enforcement patrol vehicles are not new to law enforcement or other highway patrol agencies throughout the country. This is something that we have been discussing for the past year and we now have...

DON'T RUN THE GATES

DON'T RUN THE GATES

Date: 01/13/2017 

As winter weather continues to impact many Wyoming highways, with some leading to highway closures, a recent event on South Pass between Farson and Lander highlights why it is important to heed the road closures.    On January 11th, the Wyoming Highway Patrol received a call from a stranded motorist on Wyoming State Highway 28, which had been closed for nearly two days. The motorist had went around the road closure gate near Farson and ran into poor road conditions and became stuck near milepost 41 in a snow drift. South Pass area Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) crews had to plow a...

WHP LIEUTENANT TO RETIRE

WHP LIEUTENANT TO RETIRE

Date: 01/11/2017 

Lieutenant Chris Schell retired from the Wyoming Highway Patrol on December 30th, 2016 after nearly 21 years of service to Wyoming.    Lt. Schell began his career with the WHP on January 16th, 1996 as a Patrolman in Casper. After serving in this role until November of 2006, Schell promoted to sergeant in the Safety and Training division of Patrol where he ran the WHP training academy. In November of 2014, Schell promoted again to lieutenant as the Division B supervisor in Casper. There he supervised the troopers in Division B, that covers all of Natrona County, until his retirement.    As the Academy...

HIGH WIND CLOSURES ARE NOT TO BE TAKEN LIGHTLY

HIGH WIND CLOSURES ARE NOT TO BE TAKEN LIGHTLY

Date: 12/20/2016 

Despite sections of Wyoming highways being closed to light and high profile vehicles, many motorists are not heeding the closures with crashes resulting statewide.   As wind speeds are exceeding 60 mph in certain parts of Wyoming, many highways have been closed to light and high profile vehicles to avoid those vehicles becoming a hazard to themselves and other motorists. Despite the closures, motorists proceeding in light and high profile vehicles have been crashing.    The Wyoming Highway Patrol has investigated 80 crashes statewide beginning on Dec. 19th through 9:45 a.m. today (Dec. 20th). Many...

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.
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