Wyoming Highway Patrol
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"80 means 80"
With over two weeks of the new 80 mile per hour speed limit on 488 miles of Wyoming interstate highways in the books, we are emphasizeing that 80 mph means 80 mph. Troopers across the state that work in these 80 mph zones are reporting that motorists are pushing their speeds past the posted limit and are increasing the risk of being stopped.  The safety and welfare of the motoring public is a priority to the Wyoming Highway Patrol and that the 80 mph speed limit will be strictly enforced.  Increasing your speed reduces the amount of time you have to react to avoid becoming involved in a crash or avoid a hazard on the road. The speed limit is set to keep motorists operating at a safe speed on the highways. When drivers go over that limit, they risk injuring themselves and others. Obey the limit and avoid becoming a statistic.
 

 


ROAD & TRAVEL INFORMATION

  • For Road & Travel Information call:

    IN-STATE:  511 OR  1-888-WYO-ROAD (996-7623)

    OUT OF STATE: 1-888- WYO-ROAD (996-7623) 

TO REPORT A DRUNK DRIVER OR AN EMERGENCY

  • To contact the Patrol in an emergency or to Report a Drunk Driver:

    IN STATE CALL: 1-800-442-9090

    OUT OF STATE  CALL: 1-307-777-4321  

     

TROOPERS PUT AN END TO AUTO THEFT STRING

TROOPERS PUT AN END TO AUTO THEFT STRING

Date: 09/29/2014 

On September 26th, two juvenile runaways from Colorado were arrested by a Wyoming State Trooper for a string of vehicle thefts from Colorado and Wyoming. A stolen vehicle report was received from Jackson, Wyoming to look for a stolen GMC pickup truck. While Deputies from the Fremont County Sheriff's Office and Troopers from Patrol were looking for the pickup in the Dubois area, the Fremont  County Sheriff's Office received another report of a Toyota SUV stolen from Dubois.   A trooper located the stolen Toyota and two juveniles at a store in Crowheart, Wyoming. The two juveniles were reported as...

WYOMING HIGHWAY PATROL DISPATCH GRADUATES SIX NEW DISPATCHERS

WYOMING HIGHWAY PATROL DISPATCH GRADUATES SIX NEW DISPATCHERS

Date: 09/23/2014 

Six new dispatchers completed their classroom training and celebrated with a graduation ceremony on September 19th at the communications center in Cheyenne. Wyoming Highway Patrol Dispatch trainees go through five weeks of classroom training where they learn about a variety of topics. Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD), geography, emergency and non-emergency call taking, telephone procedures, National Crime Information Center (NCIC), basic law and high risk traffic stops are just a few of the many topics the dispatchers studied.    This class was the first Wyoming Highway Patrol Communications Basic...

TANKER ROLLOVER EAST OF LOVELL CAUSES LANE CLOSURE ON US 14A

TANKER ROLLOVER EAST OF LOVELL CAUSES LANE CLOSURE ON US 14A

Date: 09/10/2014 

A tanker hauling 5,500 gallons of latex crashed and rolled at mile post 71 on US 14A approximately 25 miles east of Lovell on September 09th at 7:50 in the morning. The driver of the 2012 Volvo tractor, 59 year old Dennis Spurbeck of New Philadelphia, Ohio, was negotiating a curved section of the highway with a 10% downgrade. Troopers on scene are investigating brake failure as the contributing factor in the crash as the truck's speed became too great for the downgrade which caused the truck to trip and roll. The crash caused one lane of travel to be closed.    The load of latex is not considered...

FLEEING SUSPECT INJURED AFTER BEING STRUCK BY CAR ON INTERSTATE 90

FLEEING SUSPECT INJURED AFTER BEING STRUCK BY CAR ON INTERSTATE 90

Date: 09/10/2014 

33 year old Matthew P. McDonald of Knoxville, Tennessee has been taken into custody after resisting arrest and running into oncoming traffic on Interstate 90. Mr. McDonald was stopped by a Wyoming State Trooper for speeding 91 mph in a posted 80 mph zone at 9:15 a.m. on September 09th approximately 16 miles west of Sundance at mile post 169 on I 90 eastbound.   Through the course of the stop, the trooper ascertained probable cause to arrest Mr. McDonald for multiple violations. While attempting to place Mr. McDonald into custody, McDonald ran from the trooper on foot into oncoming interstate traffic....

TROOPERS' INSTINCTS, SOCIAL MEDIA AND A PHONE CALL TO JAIL LEAD TO A FORT COLLINS MAN'S ARREST

TROOPERS' INSTINCTS, SOCIAL MEDIA AND A PHONE CALL TO JAIL LEAD TO A FORT COLLINS MAN'S ARREST

Date: 09/08/2014 

A call on August 29th, at approximately 6:38 a.m., sent Wyoming State Troopers to mile post 232 on Interstate 25 looking for a man jumping into traffic. When troopers arrived at the location 40 miles north of Casper, they encountered a male and female claiming they had run out of gas. After inquiring about the occupants' names and receiving conflicting information, the troopers became suspicious that the male and female were not being fully forthcoming about who the male was.     Through conversation with the female, identified as 21 year old Nissa L. Dipalma of Fort Collins, Colorado, troopers...

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.

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