Wyoming Highway Patrol
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As fall has arrived and winter weather becomes more frequent by the day, a few standard driving safety tips could be very helpful while traveling on Wyoming highways. Speed is always a key factor in staying safe. The slower you go in adverse road conditions, the safer you are. Slowing down increases your time to react if you were to lose control of your vehicle. Decreasing your speed also lowers the severity of a crash if you were to become involved in one. 
 
If a highway is dry and you are approaching a bridge deck, be cognizant that the bridge deck could be icy even if the road approaching the bridge is dry. Bridge decks stay cooler then a roadway as there is no ground underneath them to retain heat. Cruise control on snow and ice covered roads is not your friend. Your cruise control can result in an unanticipated loss of traction between your vehicle and the roadway during inclement weather. Always have your cruise control off when driving during adverse road conditions. Let your antilock braking systems (ABS) do their job if you start to slide on ice and snow. You cannot pump your brakes faster than your ABS does for you. 
 
Please observe road closures when they are in place as the road is closed for your safety. Although the road may appear to be just fine where you and the road closure gate are, conditions or some other event, such as a crash blocking all lanes of travel, are further down the highway making it hazardous. Remember to slow down and/or move over for our emergency responders at roadside to help keep them and you safe as well. Secondary crashes into prior crash scenes are one of the most dangerous hazards our first responders face. Practicing patience when the weather turns bad and asking yourself before leaving on your trip if driving in the poor conditions is truly worth the risk of becoming involved in a crash are two key practices in staying safe when hazardous road conditions exist. Drive safe Wyoming, and have a great fall and winter season.      
 
 

 


ROAD & TRAVEL INFORMATION

  • For Road & Travel Information call:

    IN-STATE:  511 OR  1-888-WYO-ROAD (996-7623)

    OUT OF STATE: 1-888- WYO-ROAD (996-7623) 

TO REPORT A DRUNK DRIVER OR AN EMERGENCY

  • To contact the Patrol in an emergency or to Report a Drunk Driver:

    IN STATE CALL: 1-800-442-9090

    OUT OF STATE  CALL: 1-307-777-4321  

     

Mustaches For Mark

Mustaches For Mark

Date: 12/08/2014 

Wyoming State Trooper Mark Shinost has served the citizens and motorists of Wyoming for the past 25 years. Mark was recently diagnosed with cancer. Troopers in Mark's Division F and across the state are growing mustaches out in support of Mark in his battle with cancer.  We invite and challenge everyone else in the Wyoming Highway Patrol to show Mark your support and grow your mustaches out as well! We extend this challenge to other law enforcement and public safety personnel, friends of Mark, and anyone else wanting to participate. In doing so, we want to tell Mark that "We've got your back",...

WY 59 ENHANCED ENFORCEMENT UPDATE

WY 59 ENHANCED ENFORCEMENT UPDATE

Date: 12/04/2014 

The Wyoming Highway Patrol's enhanced enforcement efforts continue on WY 59 between Douglas and Gillette. Troopers have been working altered shifts and additional troopers are being brought in from other divisions to assist with the efforts to increase highway safety on WY 59. Attention has been focused on general traffic enforcement with special attention on the contributing factors identified in fatal crashes for 2014. Commercial vehicle violations that are commonly investigated by our troopers and often called in as complaints by local motorists have also been given special attention.   From...

WYOMING RADIO STATION AND HOST RECOGNIZED

WYOMING RADIO STATION AND HOST RECOGNIZED

Date: 12/01/2014 

On November 28th, Troopers Kannier, Tippy, Lopez, Williams and K-9 Basil presented Johnny King and WYORadio with an award from the Wyoming Highway Patrol and Wyoming Highway Patrol Association for the continued support for the Alive at 25 program.    Johnny King has opened his doors to the Wyoming Highway Patrol allowing Trooper Kannier to come onto his morning show on KQSW 96.5 any time he pleases and at no cost to promote the Alive at 25 program. In addition, Johnny King and his wife Kelli continue to talk about and support the Alive-At-25 program on the air on a regular basis. Through his radio...

2014 WYOMING HIGHWAY FATALITIES UPDATE

2014 WYOMING HIGHWAY FATALITIES UPDATE

Date: 11/25/2014 

The number of highway fatalities in Wyoming for 2014 has reached 136 unnecessary deaths so far this year. Many have asked why the fatalities are so much higher than the total number of fatalities for the entire year of 2013 totaling 87. The low number of fatalities in 2013 was a positive accomplishment, but was not expected to become the normal trend. The good news is that a 20 year comparison from 1994 to preliminary numbers so far for 2014 is showing a continued downward trend in the number of fatalities from crashes in Wyoming. Although the numbers oscillate up and down each year, the deaths...

DRIVER APPRECIATION DAY AT THE SUNDANCE PORT OF ENTRY

DRIVER APPRECIATION DAY AT THE SUNDANCE PORT OF ENTRY

Date: 11/21/2014 

It was Driver Appreciation Day at the Sundance Port of Entry today in recognition of all the men and women who transport all the things we use on a daily basis to keep our country moving. Thank you from the Wyoming Highway Patrol and Sundance Port employees Shelly McDonald, Beck Fowler, Teresa Sutton, Bobbie Ballard, and Samantha Sipe

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.

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