Wyoming Highway Patrol
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The Wyoming Highway Patrol's vision is to be Wyoming's leader in highway safety. Our mission is to serve and protect all people in Wyoming with courtesy, professionalism and integrity. We strive to fulfill our vision and mission through our eight core values of integrity, courage, discipline, loyalty, diligence, humility, optimism and conviction.

 


ROAD & TRAVEL INFORMATION

  • For Road & Travel Information call:

    IN-STATE:  511 OR  1-888-WYO-ROAD (996-7623)

    OUT OF STATE: 1-888- WYO-ROAD (996-7623) 

TO REPORT A DRUNK DRIVER OR AN EMERGENCY

  • To contact the Patrol in an emergency or to Report a Drunk Driver:

    IN STATE CALL: 1-800-442-9090

    OUT OF STATE  CALL: 1-307-777-4321  

     

TWO COUNTY SATURATION PATROL

TWO COUNTY SATURATION PATROL

Date: 02/12/2016 

Motorists traveling through Converse and Platte Counties on Interstate 25 last Monday (Feb. 8th) may have noticed an increased presence of law enforcement on I-25 and adjoining highways.    Troopers from Division M, that are responsible for the two counties, as well as Troopers from adjacent divisions and Deputies from Converse and Platte County participated in a one day saturation patrol with a focus on highway traffic safety and criminal interdiction. Approximately 15 Troopers and Deputies, including six K-9 teams, participated in the saturation event.    Wyoming Highway Patrol Colonel Kebin...

DRIFTED OVER VEHICLES SERVE AS SAFETY REMINDER

DRIFTED OVER VEHICLES SERVE AS SAFETY REMINDER

Date: 02/10/2016 

Severe winter weather and multiple crashes resulted in a road closure in both directions on Interstate 80 between Cheyenne and Laramie on Saturday (Feb. 6th) resulting in motorists becoming stranded behind the crashes. The first crash occurred around 2:20 p.m. near mile post 340 eastbound, approximately 20 miles west of Cheyenne, when a commercial truck crashed into a WYDOT snowplow blocking all lanes. Shortly after that crash, all westbound lanes became blocked due to multiple crashes in the same vicinity (mile post 340).   As law enforcement, first responders, WYDOT and tow companies attempted...

CODY TROOPER BACK TO FULL DUTY AFTER SUSTAINING INJURY FROM CRASH

CODY TROOPER BACK TO FULL DUTY AFTER SUSTAINING INJURY FROM CRASH

Date: 02/10/2016 

Wyoming Highway Patrol Trooper Rodney Miears returned back to full duty today (Feb. 10th) after recovering from injuries sustained in a two vehicle crash back on June 15th, 2015.     Trooper Miears was traveling east on US 14/16/20 near mile post 33 at the entrance of the Yellowstone Valley Inn west of Cody, Wyoming when at 2:11 p.m. a westbound commercial truck with trailer had slowed to turn left into the Yellowstone Valley Inn. The driver turned left and failed to yield to Trooper Miears. Trooper Miears utilized emergency braking and swerved right in an attempt to avoid the truck, but the two...

CLASS 90 COMMERCIAL VEHICLE ENFORCEMENT TRAINING

CLASS 90 COMMERCIAL VEHICLE ENFORCEMENT TRAINING

Date: 02/08/2016 

Recruit Class 90 spent all last week receiving instruction in commercial vehicle enforcement. Last Thursday, Class 90 took part in practical exercises at the Casper Port of Entry despite harsh winter weather and having some highways closed hampering the amount of trucks entering the Port. With assistance from Casper Port of Entry Officers, Troopers from Casper and Lusk, and class instructors, Class 90 issued 10 permits totaling $528.16, fielded nine overweight reports with only two of those weighed being legal and issued four citations totaling $6,130. One citation alone was for $5,430 due to violations...

Stay Safe After The Big Game

Stay Safe After The Big Game

Date: 02/05/2016 

The big game is almost here. As the kick off is this Sunday, we want to remind everyone that the best defense against impaired driving is to always designate a sober driver. Last time we checked, football appetizers are not served at our local jails on game day. So plan a good offense to get home safe this weekend and whether you are rooting for Denver or Carolina, don't fumble your way into the DUI life. Always remember to buckle up and drive safe Wyoming!  

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.
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