Wyoming Highway Patrol
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As winter weather has arrived, a few standard driving safety tips could be very helpful while traveling on Wyoming highways. Speed is always a key factor in staying safe. The slower you go in adverse road conditions, the safer you are. Slowing down increases your time to react if you were to lose control of your vehicle. Decreasing your speed also lowers the severity of a crash if you were to become involved in one. 
 
If a highway is dry and you are approaching a bridge deck, be cognizant that the bridge deck could be icy even if the road approaching the bridge is dry. Bridge decks stay cooler then a roadway as there is no ground underneath them to retain heat. Cruise control on snow and ice covered roads is not your friend. Your cruise control can result in an unanticipated loss of traction between your vehicle and the roadway during inclement weather. Always have your cruise control off when driving during adverse road conditions. Let your antilock braking systems (ABS) do their job if you start to slide on ice and snow. You cannot pump your brakes faster than your ABS does for you. 
 
Please observe road closures when they are in place as the road is closed for your safety. Although the road may appear to be just fine where you and the road closure gate are, conditions or some other event, such as a crash blocking all lanes of travel, are further down the highway making it hazardous. Remember to slow down and/or move over for our emergency responders at roadside to help keep them and you safe as well. Secondary crashes into prior crash scenes are one of the most dangerous hazards our first responders face. Practicing patience when the weather turns bad and asking yourself before leaving on your trip if driving in the poor conditions is truly worth the risk of becoming involved in a crash are two key practices in staying safe when hazardous road conditions exist. Drive safe Wyoming, and have a great fall and winter season.      
 
 

 


ROAD & TRAVEL INFORMATION

  • For Road & Travel Information call:

    IN-STATE:  511 OR  1-888-WYO-ROAD (996-7623)

    OUT OF STATE: 1-888- WYO-ROAD (996-7623) 

TO REPORT A DRUNK DRIVER OR AN EMERGENCY

  • To contact the Patrol in an emergency or to Report a Drunk Driver:

    IN STATE CALL: 1-800-442-9090

    OUT OF STATE  CALL: 1-307-777-4321  

     

THE PHYSICAL EVIDENCE NEVER LIES!

THE PHYSICAL EVIDENCE NEVER LIES!

Date: 01/28/2015 

Troopers depend the most on physical evidence at crash scenes to figure out the sequence of events that occurred before, during and after a crash. This training is essential for recruits at our Trooper Basic Academy.

PATROL ACADEMY COORDINATOR APPOINTED

PATROL ACADEMY COORDINATOR APPOINTED

Date: 01/26/2015 

Last Friday, Colonel John Butler appointed Trooper Randy Starkey, a seven year Patrol veteran stationed in Lusk, as the new Academy Coordinator Sergeant for the Patrol. Sergeant Starkey takes over the position for recently promoted Lieutenant Chris Schell who now supervises the Casper area road division.   Sergeant Starkey will be responsible for coordinating, facilitating and  supervising the Patrol's recruit training program at the Wyoming Highway Patrol Basic Academy and serve as the agency liaison with the Wyoming Law Enforcement Academy. This position is key as Sergeant Starkey will be the...

WHP RECRUITS PUT COMMERCIAL VEHICLE TRAINING TO USE

WHP RECRUITS PUT COMMERCIAL VEHICLE TRAINING TO USE

Date: 01/16/2015 

On January 15th, recruits with the Wyoming Highway Patrol put their classroom training to use during a size and weight detail at the Casper Port-of-Entry. Troopers and staff assigned to the Commercial Vehicle section were on hand to educate and support the training of the recruits currently in the W.H.P. Academy. The training is used to ensure compliance with the size and weight statutes and regulations.    22 of 160 trucks that came through the port during the six hour detail were inspected. Five of the trucks inspected were found to be overweight. One of the five trucks was 13,000 plus pounds...

LIEUTENANT NATE HUGHES RETIRES AFTER 24 YEARS WITH THE WYOMING HIGHWAY PATROL

LIEUTENANT NATE HUGHES RETIRES AFTER 24 YEARS WITH THE WYOMING HIGHWAY PATROL

Date: 01/06/2015 

December 31st marked Lieutenant Nate Hughes' last day with the Wyoming Highway Patrol. Lieutenant Hughes joined the Patrol on September 04th, 1990 and was initially stationed in Wamsutter as a Patrolman. In 1996, Patrolman Hughes transferred from Wamsutter to Jackson. In April of 2000, Trooper Hughes became the Motor Carrier Officer in Douglas.   Trooper Hughes received his Lieutenant's bars in February of 2003 when he was promoted to the division supervisor in Jackson. In 2005, Lieutenant Hughes transferred back to Douglas as the division supervisor for the Douglas, Glenrock and Lusk areas where...

Mustaches For Mark

Mustaches For Mark

Date: 12/08/2014 

Wyoming State Trooper Mark Shinost has served the citizens and motorists of Wyoming for the past 25 years. Mark was recently diagnosed with cancer. Troopers in Mark's Division F and across the state are growing mustaches out in support of Mark in his battle with cancer.  We invite and challenge everyone else in the Wyoming Highway Patrol to show Mark your support and grow your mustaches out as well! We extend this challenge to other law enforcement and public safety personnel, friends of Mark, and anyone else wanting to participate. In doing so, we want to tell Mark that "We've got your back",...

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.

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