Wyoming Highway Patrol
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As fall has arrived and winter weather becomes more frequent by the day, a few standard driving safety tips could be very helpful while traveling on Wyoming highways. Speed is always a key factor in staying safe. The slower you go in adverse road conditions, the safer you are. Slowing down increases your time to react if you were to lose control of your vehicle. Decreasing your speed also lowers the severity of a crash if you were to become involved in one. 
 
If a highway is dry and you are approaching a bridge deck, be cognizant that the bridge deck could be icy even if the road approaching the bridge is dry. Bridge decks stay cooler then a roadway as there is no ground underneath them to retain heat. Cruise control on snow and ice covered roads is not your friend. Your cruise control can result in an unanticipated loss of traction between your vehicle and the roadway during inclement weather. Always have your cruise control off when driving during adverse road conditions. Let your antilock braking systems (ABS) do their job if you start to slide on ice and snow. You cannot pump your brakes faster than your ABS does for you. 
 
Please observe road closures when they are in place as the road is closed for your safety. Although the road may appear to be just fine where you and the road closure gate are, conditions or some other event, such as a crash blocking all lanes of travel, are further down the highway making it hazardous. Remember to slow down and/or move over for our emergency responders at roadside to help keep them and you safe as well. Secondary crashes into prior crash scenes are one of the most dangerous hazards our first responders face. Practicing patience when the weather turns bad and asking yourself before leaving on your trip if driving in the poor conditions is truly worth the risk of becoming involved in a crash are two key practices in staying safe when hazardous road conditions exist. Drive safe Wyoming, and have a great fall and winter season.      
 
 

 


ROAD & TRAVEL INFORMATION

  • For Road & Travel Information call:

    IN-STATE:  511 OR  1-888-WYO-ROAD (996-7623)

    OUT OF STATE: 1-888- WYO-ROAD (996-7623) 

TO REPORT A DRUNK DRIVER OR AN EMERGENCY

  • To contact the Patrol in an emergency or to Report a Drunk Driver:

    IN STATE CALL: 1-800-442-9090

    OUT OF STATE  CALL: 1-307-777-4321  

     

COLONEL BUTLER APPOINTS FOUR NEW LIEUTENANTS

COLONEL BUTLER APPOINTS FOUR NEW LIEUTENANTS

Date: 11/19/2014 

Wyoming Highway Patrol Colonel John Butler appointed four new division lieutenants today to fill three current and one upcoming vacancy in the first line supervisor ranks of the Patrol. The four new lieutenants took part in an extensive promotional process to achieve their new rank. Colonel Butler stated that "this promotional process continues to remind us of the great caliber and character in our people within the Patrol and that our future is bright."    Sergeant Chris Schell has been with the Patrol since January of 1996 and was selected from his Academy Coordinator position in Safety and Training...

59 POUNDS OF MARIJUANA SEIZED ON TRAFFIC STOP EAST OF LYMAN

59 POUNDS OF MARIJUANA SEIZED ON TRAFFIC STOP EAST OF LYMAN

Date: 11/19/2014 

  A traffic stop for speeding on November 7th resulted in the seizure of approximately 59 pounds of marijuana. The traffic stop occurred at 12:26 p.m. at mile post 51 on Interstate 80 eastbound approximately 11 miles east of Lyman, Wyoming.    A Wyoming State Trooper observed a Ford Focus travelling east at 87 mph in a posted 80 mph zone. Upon stopping the Ford, the trooper became suspicious that the occupants in the Ford were involved in some type of criminal activity, specifically drug trafficking.    A Wyoming Highway Patrol drug detection K-9 responded to the stop and alerted for the presence...

K-9 Team Recognized

K-9 Team Recognized

Date: 11/12/2014 

"Can you tell your husband that he has a SUPER trooper (Trooper Tippy) that has a drug dog named Basil? Our family saw him at Taco Johns. He took the time to introduce my son to his dog! My son LOVES dogs and law enforcement! It made my sons entire week and he now takes our chocolate lab all over the house, calls him Basil, and searches for drugs! The Trooper was one of the nicest, kindest, men I've ever met, and left a lasting impression on a little boy, who is so shy it's painful for him to interact with anyone!   The law enforcement in this community have naturally, and positively, interacted...

Trooper Basic #86 Commissioned

Trooper Basic #86 Commissioned

Date: 11/07/2014 

It takes a special person to become a Wyoming State Trooper. They have to be committed, want to help people and protect the citizens of the state. Seven new troopers are up to the challenge, having completed their training and recently being sworn in as the newest members of Patrol.   Patrol held a commissioning ceremony on November 06th where the new troopers took their oaths and received their badges in front of family and friends. The ceremony marked the 86th graduated academy class.   The new troopers recently completed an intensive training period. Those who weren’t already certified as peace...

TROOPERS LOCATE ABDUCTED CHILD FROM CASPER AREA AMBER ALERT

TROOPERS LOCATE ABDUCTED CHILD FROM CASPER AREA AMBER ALERT

Date: 11/04/2014 

A Be On The Lookout (BOLO) was given to Gillette area troopers at approximately 12:46 p.m. on November 3rd for an Amber Alert out of Casper, Wyoming. The Amber Alert was for a seven year old female named Desiree Bowden. The Amber Alert notified the troopers that Desiree Bowden's paternal grandmother, Vianna Jones, had committed a non-custodial abduction of Desiree Bowden from a playground during recess at an elementary school in North Casper.   Troopers, deputies, police officers, Wyoming State Park Officers, Game and Fish Officers and concerned citizens in the area began looking initially for...

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.

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