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ACADEMY VIDEOS

STOLEN VEHICLE RECOVERED AFTER I-90 PURSUIT

STOLEN VEHICLE RECOVERED AFTER I-90 PURSUIT

Date: 05/03/2016 

A Rapid City, South Dakota man is in custody after leading Wyoming law enforcement on a 70 mile long pursuit in a stolen vehicle on Interstate 90.   A Wyoming State Trooper initially stopped a 2005 Jeep Cherokee around 5:30 p.m. on May 2nd for speeding at mile post 142 on I-90 westbound approximately 13 miles east of Gillette, Wyoming. The Jeep had no license plates which prompted the Trooper to check the Jeep's Vehicle Identification Number (VIN). The check on the VIN revealed that the Jeep had been stolen out of Rapid City, South Dakota on that same day (May 2nd).    With the discovery of the...

HOMICIDE SUSPECT ARRESTED AFTER TWO STATE PURSUIT

HOMICIDE SUSPECT ARRESTED AFTER TWO STATE PURSUIT

Date: 04/28/2016 

A two state pursuit ended safely west of Pine Bluffs, Wyoming on April 27th resulting in Wyoming Highway Patrol Troopers arresting a wanted homicide suspect out of South Dakota.   Jared J. Stone, a 21 year old resident of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, initially led Troopers with the Nebraska State Patrol on a pursuit westbound on Interstate 80 in western Nebraska in a 1988 Oldsmobile passenger car.    As the pursuit approached Wyoming, WHP Troopers set up tire deflation stop sticks at the Wyoming / Nebraska state line on I-80 near Pine Bluffs, Wyoming. WHP Troopers successfully deployed the stop sticks...

Seat Belt Use

Seat Belt Use

Date: 04/19/2016 

Of the 13 fatalities in 2016, 12 of them had a seat belt available (one fatal was a pedestrian). 10 of the 12 fatal crashes with a seat belt available were not wearing the seat belt at the time of the crash. Seven of those 10 crashes were a single vehicle rollover.       According to a recent report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), nationwide, the seat belt usage rate is 88.5%. However, in states with no seat belt law or a secondary law (meaning you can't be pulled over for not wearing a seat belt unless another infraction is also committed) such as Wyoming, the...

2016 National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week

2016 National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week

Date: 04/16/2016 

As National Public Safety Telecommunicators Week (April 10th – 16th) draws to an end, the Wyoming Highway Patrol (WHP) wants to show our recognition on how critical of a role our public safety dispatchers play in protecting and serving the citizens and guests of Wyoming.    WHP Dispatchers not only keep Troopers safe, but also handle dispatching duties for Wyo. Game and Fish, Wyo. State Parks, Wyo. Brand Inspectors, Wyo. Outfitter's Board as well the Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service.   WHP Dispatchers work 24 / 7, 365 days a year and are the first line to providing emergency response...

Vehicle Pursuit in Weston County

Vehicle Pursuit in Weston County

Date: 04/16/2016 

A vehicle pursuit in northeast Wyoming on April 11th has resulted in the arrest of a Bismarck, North Dakota man.    The pursuit began around 3:58 p.m. on the 11th after a Wyoming State Trooper attempted to stop a northbound red 2004 Toyota passenger car for speeding 84 mph in a 70 mph zone near mile post 221 on US Highway 85 approximately 29 miles south of Newcastle, Wyoming.    The Toyota failed to stop for the Trooper with speeds increasing up to 105 mph. Four miles into the pursuit near mile post 225 on US 85, the driver of the Toyota intentionally swerved off the highway causing the Toyota...

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.

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