Wyoming Highway Patrol
road
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I will be retiring from the Wyoming Highway Patrol effective June 1st, 2015.  This was a very difficult decision for me and my family after spending 29 3/4 years of my life serving the citizens of this state.  
 
It has been an honor and a privilege to be a member of this great organization and to work with each of you in some manner.  I am extremely proud of your efforts and what you have meant to me over the years.  It's not easy to walk away from something that has played such a significant role in my life but the time has come to start the next chapter.
 
It is a cliche but what I will miss the most is the people who work here and those contacts you make along the way.  It is comforting to know that the citizens of Wyoming have you to continue to serve and watch over them!
 
I wish you all the best and hope to see you in my travels!
 

 


ROAD & TRAVEL INFORMATION

  • For Road & Travel Information call:

    IN-STATE:  511 OR  1-888-WYO-ROAD (996-7623)

    OUT OF STATE: 1-888- WYO-ROAD (996-7623) 

TO REPORT A DRUNK DRIVER OR AN EMERGENCY

  • To contact the Patrol in an emergency or to Report a Drunk Driver:

    IN STATE CALL: 1-800-442-9090

    OUT OF STATE  CALL: 1-307-777-4321  

     

LAST DAY IN OFFICE FOR WHP COLONEL JOHN BUTLER

LAST DAY IN OFFICE FOR WHP COLONEL JOHN BUTLER

Date: 05/29/2015 

Today is the last day in office for Col. John Butler, administrator and commanding officer of the Wyoming Highway Patrol. Col. Butler has served the State of Wyoming as a member of the Patrol for nearly 30 years.           In a farewell letter to Patrol personnel, Col.  Butler said, "It may be a cliché, but what I will miss the most is the people who work here and those contacts you make along the way.  It is comforting to know that the citizens of Wyoming have you to continue to serve and watch over them!"           Col. Butler began his WHP career in September 1985 as a recruit. His 12-member...

TANKER HAULING DIESEL BREACHES FROM ROLLOVER CRASH

TANKER HAULING DIESEL BREACHES FROM ROLLOVER CRASH

Date: 05/29/2015 

A rollover crash on May 28th involving a commercial truck and trailer resulted in over 4000 gallons of diesel leaking from the tanker. The crash occurred at mile post 55 on US Highway 89 at 6:19 a.m. approximately 30 miles south of Afton, Wyoming. Joshua Burrup, a 36 year old resident of Chubbuck, Idaho, was driving the 2015 Kenworth hauling diesel fuel at the time of the crash for Hansen Oil Company out of Soda Springs, Idaho. Mr. Burrup sustained minor injuries and was not transported to a hospital. Mr. Burrup was cited for failing to maintain a single lane of travel. Contributing factors in...

US 20 Mudslides

US 20 Mudslides

Date: 05/26/2015 

US 20-26-WY 789 is closed through Wind River Canyon about midway between Shoshoni and Thermopolis due to a series of mudslides at 10 locations. WYDOT has heavy equipment working to clear the mud from the highway, and a contractor is being hired to assist in the effort. The largest of the slides covers about 350 yards of the highway, with mud depths ranging from 3 to 8 feet. WYDOT geologists will assess the slides to assist in making the decision when it is safe to reopen the highway.  

2015 National Peace Officer Memorial Week

2015 National Peace Officer Memorial Week

Date: 05/11/2015 

This week (May 10th - 16th) is National Peace Officer Memorial Week and is dedicated to honoring the courage and saluting the sacrifice to the 117 police officers lost in 2014 and all others in years past. On average, one law enforcement officer is killed in the line of duty somewhere in the United States every 58 hours. Since the first known line-of-duty death in 1791, more than 20,000 U.S. law enforcement officers have made the ultimate sacrifice. We remember and honor our lost Wyoming Highway Patrol Patrolmen and Troopers William Barnett - 1965 Pete Visser - 1981 Chris Logsdon - 1998 "The wicked...

OVER 31 YEARS OF SERVICE HEADED TO RETIREMENT

OVER 31 YEARS OF SERVICE HEADED TO RETIREMENT

Date: 05/01/2015 

Lieutenant Tom Adams is the Division I Supervisor in Lander and will officially be retired today after over 31 years of service to the citizens of Wyoming. Lieutenant Adams began his career with the Patrol on May 5th, 1984 and was initially stationed in Farson. Lieutenant Adams promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on June 1st, 2007 to the area supervisor of Division P, Elk Mountain. Lieutenant Adams transferred to the Lander division that covers the Fremont County area in June of 2011. Lieutenant Adams has forever been a strong advocate for the Wyoming Highway Patrol and the Wyoming Highway Patrol...

Although the Patrol's first official day of existence was June 1, 1933, its roots go back another 12 years.  Paving the way for establishing the Patrol was the dissolution of the Wyoming Department of Law Enforcement, which had been created to enforce liquor prohibition laws.  The department's duties were later broadened to include enforcement of motor vehicle laws.  By early 1933, prohibition was nearing an end contributing to the sentiment that an agency created to enforce "dry" laws was no longer needed.

Realizing that something was needed to fill this freshly created void in state law enforcement, Govenor Miller went before the Highway Commission and proposed establishing a Highway patrol.  The Commission concurred.  On May 23, 1933 the Highway Commission confirmed Captain George "Red" Smith as the first Commander of the patrol and hired six patrolmen to cover the state. The Patrolmen were paid $175 a month, were furnished an automobile, uniforms and Sam Browne belts and Brown riding boots. 

Although June 1st was supposed the first day of existence, it was almost a week later before the new patrol cars were delivered and the seven men could begin their new duties.  

 

What it takes to become a WHP Dispatcher:
·         Provide a communications link between the public & emergency services
 
·         Ensure officers receive necessary assistance and backup with an emphasis on officer safety
 
·         Process trooper initiated traffic stops and/or any other situations requiring trooper response
·         Direct emergency response to motor vehicle crashes and other emergency situations
 
·         Send medical assistance to the injured
 
·         Direct aid to disabled motorists
 
·         Document officer activities and event details
 
·         Provide officers with information from computerized law enforcement files
 
·         Furnish information to other law enforcement, the public and numerous other agencies
 
Typically no two days are the same for a WHP dispatcher, which certainly provides for a variety within their daily scope of duties.

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